Bromer Sound Speaker Cabinets

Bromer Sound has launched a bass speaker cabinet that is as small as a violin case and weighs only 12 pounds, making it easy to carry in a subway, small car, or bike rack.  Despite the small size, it handles
By Bass Player Staff ,

Bromer Sound has launched a bass speaker cabinet that is as small as a violin case and weighs only 12 pounds, making it easy to carry in a subway, small car, or bike rack. Despite the small size, it handles over 100 watts and has full bass response, measured 5 dB down at 40 Hz. The combination of small size and strong bass is made possible by its patent-pending “transverse waveguide” design, in which the speaker faces sideways into a narrow, tapered slot only one inch thick.

The inventor, physicist, and bass player Nick Bromer has been experimenting with woofers for two decades. Explaining the physics of this latest invention, Bromer says, “The tapered waveguide acoustically mimics a small portion of the surface of a pulsating 30-foot diameter sphere. A large pulsating sphere has a good bass response, and therefore so does the small portion of the sphere that we use in the Transverse Waveguide.”

The Bromer cabinet, which is made of 5-ply Baltic birch, mounts a single 8-inch, 150-watt RMS Eminence neodymium speaker. According to Bromer, the bass response is independent of the diameter of the speaker, and depends only on the taper and the length of the narrow waveguide. Bromer demonstrated a woofer based on a 3.5-inch speaker at the AES show in New York last year; it also appears on Bromer’s Youtube video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSaIkG_wGoQ

Bromer Sound, which is donating 10% of its profits to partners of ONE, is developing new versions of the Transverse Waveguide, such as a subwoofer model for PA.

Bromer Sound introduced a patented fold-up “arcuate” bass speaker at the NAMM show in 2008, with eight speakers were mounted in a semi-circle. “The Transverse Waveguide is smaller than the arcuate design because it uses a much smaller portion of a large vibrating surface,” according to Bromer.

As a result of his experiments, Bromer believes that the bass response of the Transverse Waveguide can be made arbitrarily deep by making the waveguide longer.

Bromer, who is a registered patent attorney, holds eight patents, with several more pending. His first experiment in bass was an air-powered woofer built from sewer pipe and beer cans. Bromer has also published original research in the mathematics of tetration. Before becoming a lawyer, he taught physics at Penn State.

For more information, visit www.bromersound.com.