The Bird And The Bee: Interpreting The Masters Vol. 1: A Tribute To Daryl Hall and John Oates [Blue Note]

Of the many records that one accumulates over years of music appreciation a few have real staying power. Some turn into old, reliable friends—the kind you can turn to for a reliable dose of good feeling. The Bird and the Bee’s last record, Ray Guns Are Not The Future, is such a record for me. The Los Angeles duo’s smooth and tuneful earcandy- sweetened pop is seductive and deceptively smart. There new record, a completely reverent homage to the oft-mocked (unfairly) Hall & Oates, is no different. Much of the bass is synthesized, but it’s still killer, funky, and fun.
By Jonathan Herrera ,

Of the many records that one accumulates over years of music appreciation a few have real staying power. Some turn into old, reliable friends—the kind you can turn to for a reliable dose of good feeling. The Bird and the Bee’s last record, Ray Guns Are Not The Future, is such a record for me. The Los Angeles duo’s smooth and tuneful earcandy- sweetened pop is seductive and deceptively smart. There new record, a completely reverent homage to the oft-mocked (unfairly) Hall & Oates, is no different. Much of the bass is synthesized, but it’s still killer, funky, and fun.