The Real World(2)

Name Dave BaronHome base New YorkOccupation Camera assistant for NBC’s 30 RockGigs The Georgia 5, Huggy Bear & The Sweathogs, The Twelve (a rock musical)
By BassPlayer ,

Name Dave Baron
Home base New York
Occupation Camera assistant for NBC’s 30 Rock
Gigs The Georgia 5, Huggy Bear & The Sweathogs, The Twelve (a rock musical)
Basses Lakland USA Joe Osborn, Spector NS5XL-CRFM, Fender Marcus Miller Jazz
Rig Eden WT1205, Mesa Boogie Powerhouse 610
Strings, etc: DR Strings Lo-Riders
Heroes & inspiration Donald “Duck” Dunn, Graham Maby, James Jamerson, John Entwistle, Will Lee
How did you come to play bass? I was 16 and a frustrated guitar player. I had no equipment and no clue what the bass was supposed to do, but I got drafted to play it in my first trio.
What’s a lesson you’ve learned along the way? Since a typical bar crowd just wants to be entertained, the band has to serve that function or the best chops in the world don’t mean a thing. It’s not enough to just get up and play songs. If a connection isn’t made with the audience, the gig is a failure.
What are your musical goals? My biggest goal is simply to keep playing despite my job taking up an enormous amount of my time. A typical week at 30 Rock is 60 to 70 hours, which doesn’t leave much time to practice or perform. But if I can play one or two gigs a month, I’m happy.
Contact myspace.com/davidebaron, myspace.com/huggybearandthesweathogs

Name Roger Alcantara (a.k.a. Mister Nobody)
Home base Manila, Philippines
Occupation Marketing Manager/ Product Specialist
Gigs Eternal Now (progressive metal)
Basses Aria STB-JB-DX/5 custom, Aria STB-JB custom, Aria IGB-35/5
Rig Ampeg Micro-VR and Ampeg SVT-210AV cabinet; Ashdown Engineering MAG-300H and two Ashdown Engineering MAG-410t cabinets
Effects Artec Twinhead, Artec Vintage Phase Shifter
Strings Snarling Dogs Nickel Roundwounds (Heavy)
Heroes & inspiration Tony Levin, Paul McCartney, Lee Sklar, Jonas Reingold, Les Claypool, Louis A. Ochoa
How did you come to play bass? I wanted to become a drummer at first, but after seeing one of the best bassists on our high school campus, Mr. Louis A. Ochoa, I decided I wanted to become a bassist, too. I eventually took a few informal lessons with Mr. Ochoa and pretty soon I was slinging the bass.
What’s a lesson you’ve learned along the way? When I first started, I had the notion that I had to fly all over the fretboard to unleash all the licks I could fit into a bar. It was fun, and it gave a different texture to our songs, but it was all about me, and never about what was needed in the song. Since then, I have started listening to my bandmates to try to figure out what I can contribute to help them sound better. I want to sound like a band, not just a bunch of guys taking solos.
What are your musical goals? At first, I had very simple goals: release an album, play gigs, etc. Now that I’ve achieved some of those goals, I feel I have a more meaningful goal. Progressive rock is not a very popular genre here in Manila, and I feel a huge responsibility to introduce this music to the masses. Another goal is to help strengthen the bond between Filipino bassists from all corners of the world, so I started a local online community for lovers of the low end. It’s really great interacting with people who share the same passion.
Contact www.facebook.com/eternalnow, twitter.com/rogeralcantara, subsonicpinoy. proboards.com (a Filipino bass forum)