Court of Opinion: December 2012

Fender recently posted their list of “Five Famous Fender Basses,” which included James Jamerson’s “Funk Machine,” Jaco Pastorius’ “Bass of Doom,” John Entwistle’s “Frankenstein,” Paul Simonon’s London Calling Precision Bass, and Steve Harris’s West Ham United F.C. Precision Bass. What’s on your list?
By BassPlayer ,

COURT OF OPINION

Fender recently posted their list of “Five Famous Fender Basses,” which included James Jamerson’s “Funk Machine,” Jaco Pastorius’ “Bass of Doom,” John Entwistle’s “Frankenstein,” Paul Simonon’s London Calling Precision Bass, and Steve Harris’s West Ham United F.C. Precision Bass. What’s on your list?

“Duck” Dunn’s Precision. —Tony Bishop

I’d say Sid Vicious’ P-Bass should be on the list. —Joel Dawson

Jaco’s fretless “Bass of Doom” Jazz, Billy Sheehan’s “Wife,” Joe Long’s stack-knob lefty 1960 Jazz Bass, and Berry Oakley’s famous “Tractor” Jazz Bass. —Austin Branca

Jaco’s “Bass of Doom,” Geddy Lee’s black Jazz, Larry Graham’s Jazz Basses, Duck Dunn’s Precisions, Darryl Jones’ white Jazz, and Fernando Saunders’, Mark Egan’s, Percy Jones’, and Bunny Brunel’s fretless Precisions. —Richard Brown

There are really too many to name. Louis Johnson fi rst blasted on the scene with a natural Precision. —Richard Brown

Phil Lynott, anyone? —Johan Niemann

What about Anthony Jackson’s “Career Girl” ’75 Jazz with a ’73 Precision neck? Mmm. . . . —Llewellyn John

“Family Man’s” J, Rocco Prestia’s P, George Porter Jr.’s P, Berry Oakley’s J, and of course, James Jamerson’s P. —Kevin Roy

James Jamerson’s P-Bass, Larry Graham’s J-Bass, Chuck Rainey’s P-Bass, Jaco Pastorius’ J-Bass, Marcus Miller’s modified J-Bass. —Al Gates

Marcus Miller’s natural Jazz, Jaco’s sunburst Jazz, Verdine White’s Olympic white Jazz, Sting’s sunburst ’50s Precision, and Steve Harris’ P-Bass, when it was painted blue. —Alan Ace Cooper

Lee Sklar’s P-Bass on the early James Taylor charts, David Hungate’s ’63 P-Bass on Boz Scaggs’ “Lowdown,” Carol Kaye’s P-Basses on all those Beach Boys hits, Mr. Jamerson’s “Funk Machine,” and McCartney’s ’66 Jazz on the White Album.—Michael R Cheney