’Arry On!

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Iron Maiden’s Steve Harris leaves it all on the stage on July 14th, 2012 in Sarnia, Ontario, Canada. Currently in the States on his band’s Maiden England World Tour, Harris is preparing for the release of British Lion [Universal], his fi rst solo project since forming Iron Maiden in 1975. Look for an in-depth interview with the giant of metal bass in an upcoming issue of BASS PLAYER. In the meantime, Up the Irons!

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