Beauties & Beasts:Show Us What You’ve Got! - BassPlayer.com

Beauties & Beasts:Show Us What You’ve Got!

ATTENTION FENDER FANS: IF YOU HAVE photos of a beloved Jazz Bass, we want to see them. Whether pampered and cared for or beaten to bits—like this 1978 Jazz belonging to San Francisco bassist Justin Flores—tweet your pics to @BassPlayerNow, and we’ll post them at bassplayer.com. Be sure to include your name, location, and whatever you know about your bass’s specs and pedigree.
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ATTENTION FENDER FANS: IF YOU HAVE photos of a beloved Jazz Bass, we want to see them. Whether pampered and cared for or beaten to bits—like this 1978 Jazz belonging to San Francisco bassist Justin Flores—tweet your pics to @BassPlayerNow, and we’ll post them at bassplayer.com. Be sure to include your name, location, and whatever you know about your bass’s specs and pedigree.

Tom “T-Bone” Wolk, 1951–2010

As we were going to press, BASS PLAYER got word that Tom “T-Bone” Wolk, longtime bassist with Hall & Oates and the Saturday Night Live Band had died of an apparent heart attack. Look for a full tribute to T-Bone next month.

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Liam Wilson of The Dillinger Escape Plan

 I’ve always loved to cop the Jaco punk-jazz stuff or like, you know, fusion-metal or something like that. I really abhor the whole sub-categorizing thing, but I definitely feel like my band is a mix of like really fusion-y stuff, really metal stuff, thrashier metal stuff, and a little bit of melodic pop, poppier sensibility, [with a] kind of punk attitude? I don’t know.

John Campbell of Lamb Of God

 Honestly, I never saw the bass and was like, “I’m going to play bass.” I had friends [and] the opportunity to play music came up…they had a house with stuff set up, and I was playing my friend’s drums with his roommates and the bass playin’ roommate took off for the summer. My friends whose drums they were was like, “Hey, why don’t you just let me play my drums and you can play Mike’s bass rig.” And that was when I was 18, and that’s how I ended up playing bass.

Brian Bromberg: It Is What It Is [Mack Avenue-Artistry Music]

Never one to shun the smooth jazz specter, it seems only fitting that Brian Bromberg jumpstarts the sagging idiom with his vibrant latest effort. Punctuated by a 5- piece horn section and all-star guest list throughout, the 13-track disc gets down to business with the hard-swinging big band title track opener. From there come feel-good covers of “Love Shack” and “Sanford and Son Theme,” fretless poise on “Heaven,” and Marcus-nodding thumb on “Elephants on Skates” and “Mr. Miller.” For full sonic contrast, dig the resonant solo tenor bass ballad “Mirror” and the disc-closing “Slap Happy,” with Brian in shredder mode on overdriven piccolo bass.

Sharlee D’angelo of Arch Enemy

I think it’s great actually that people are getting interested in musicianship as such again – especially the guitar players, you’d be amazed by how fast they are, and their technique and everything. And some of them, you give them a few more years and I think someone will probably come up with stuff even better. So I think it’s a good thing. People start out playing a lot of technical stuff and then after a while they’ll probably slow down a little bit and just use whatever musical abilities they have to go to the next level.