Beauties & Beasts:Show Us What You’ve Got!

ATTENTION FENDER FANS: IF YOU HAVE photos of a beloved Jazz Bass, we want to see them. Whether pampered and cared for or beaten to bits—like this 1978 Jazz belonging to San Francisco bassist Justin Flores—tweet your pics to @BassPlayerNow, and we’ll post them at bassplayer.com. Be sure to include your name, location, and whatever you know about your bass’s specs and pedigree.
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ATTENTION FENDER FANS: IF YOU HAVE photos of a beloved Jazz Bass, we want to see them. Whether pampered and cared for or beaten to bits—like this 1978 Jazz belonging to San Francisco bassist Justin Flores—tweet your pics to @BassPlayerNow, and we’ll post them at bassplayer.com. Be sure to include your name, location, and whatever you know about your bass’s specs and pedigree.

Tom “T-Bone” Wolk, 1951–2010

As we were going to press, BASS PLAYER got word that Tom “T-Bone” Wolk, longtime bassist with Hall & Oates and the Saturday Night Live Band had died of an apparent heart attack. Look for a full tribute to T-Bone next month.

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Sharlee D’angelo of Arch Enemy

I think it’s great actually that people are getting interested in musicianship as such again – especially the guitar players, you’d be amazed by how fast they are, and their technique and everything. And some of them, you give them a few more years and I think someone will probably come up with stuff even better. So I think it’s a good thing. People start out playing a lot of technical stuff and then after a while they’ll probably slow down a little bit and just use whatever musical abilities they have to go to the next level.

Liam Wilson of The Dillinger Escape Plan

 I’ve always loved to cop the Jaco punk-jazz stuff or like, you know, fusion-metal or something like that. I really abhor the whole sub-categorizing thing, but I definitely feel like my band is a mix of like really fusion-y stuff, really metal stuff, thrashier metal stuff, and a little bit of melodic pop, poppier sensibility, [with a] kind of punk attitude? I don’t know.

Beautiful Dirty Bass

DURING THE LATE 1950s, IN HIS MUSICAL director-type role for the most popular singer on the planet, Bill Black had to plug in his new Fender Precision, look to ensure guitarist Scotty Moore and drummer D.J. Fontana were at the ready, watch for Elvis Presley’s nodding cue, and lean into one of his regal rockabilly grooves.