Bunny Brunel Fretless Bass

No frets, no frills; that’s the approach Bunny Brunel takes on this effective introduction to playing the fretless species. Simply addressing the camera with bass in hand for 60 minutes and 16 chapters, Bunny covers and demonstrates key elements for the intermediate player making the leap from fretted bass. These include his recommendation of fret lines, how and where to place your left hand fingers, intonation, vibrato, sliding, right hand plucking and placement, pickup settings, note duration, and basic scales, modes and bass line exercises to induce a fretless sound and state of mind. Best are his careerearned inside tips, such as how vibrato utilizing the note below your pitch rather than above more resembles the way a vocalist sings, and how waiting until the final note of a phrase to add vibrato is also more natural, a la the human voice.
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No frets, no frills; that’s the approach Bunny Brunel takes on this effective introduction to playing the fretless species. Simply addressing the camera with bass in hand for 60 minutes and 16 chapters, Bunny covers and demonstrates key elements for the intermediate player making the leap from fretted bass. These include his recommendation of fret lines, how and where to place your left hand fingers, intonation, vibrato, sliding, right hand plucking and placement, pickup settings, note duration, and basic scales, modes and bass line exercises to induce a fretless sound and state of mind. Best are his careerearned inside tips, such as how vibrato utilizing the note below your pitch rather than above more resembles the way a vocalist sings, and how waiting until the final note of a phrase to add vibrato is also more natural, a la the human voice.

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