CD Review: Andrew Gouche "We Don't Need No Bass"

Long-awaited and much-anticipated, Andrew Gouche’s solo debut hits with the kind of impact that takes you back to the first time you heard the gospel great and his swing-for-the-fences swagger.
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Long-awaited and much-anticipated, Andrew Gouche’s solo debut hits with the kind of impact that takes you back to the first time you heard the gospel great and his swing-for-the-fences swagger. The title track, a tongue-in-cheek allusion to church sentiment about the instrument before Gouche came along, sets the table. A funk-rock cover of “Eleanor Rigby” establishes the pace, Andrew’s hard-plucked MTD 6-string handling the melody and in-between commentary while meticulously orchestrated sections unfold. Similarly, “MTD4Lyfe” and “Geronimo” sport a wave of layered basses, James Brown-like part assignment, and the spontaneous vamps and unison riffs for which Gouche’s live bands are known. On the ballad side, Andrew’s Boss GT-10B-enhanced bass is the expressive “vocal” lead on his own “Sundays” and a cover of the Fred Hammond & Commissioned classic, “A Secret Place.” Elsewhere, “Way Back When” and the James Cleveland tribute “No Ways Tired” lean old school, as does a fun take on the Gap Band’s “Early in the Morning,” a nod to Andrew’s bass hero, Robert Wilson. Let the praise begin.

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