CD Review: Byron Miller "Psycho Bass"

On his latest solo outing, veteran groove great Byron Miller—perhaps best known for his “Reach for It” solo with George Duke [see BP February ’15]—reinvents himself as the Bootsy-esque character Psycho Bass.
Author:
Updated:
Original:

On his latest solo outing, veteran groove great Byron Miller—perhaps best known for his “Reach for It” solo with George Duke [see BP February ’15]—reinvents himself as the Bootsy-esque character Psycho Bass. Introducing himself (and establishing the formidable funk formula that lies ahead) on the opening title track, Miller blows on his effect-juiced signature MTD with bluesy ease and abandon. His high-flying lead bass prowess continues on “Psycho Management” (with its Marcus Miller-minded harmonies), a sweet cover of Blu Cantrell’s “U Must Be Crazy,” and Duke’s “Oh, Really” (one of three tracks Duke appears on). Miller also mans an acoustic bass guitar to “sing” the underrated Al Jarreau gem “Heart’s Horizon.” On the support side, Miller muscles the fusion-y blues of “Psycho Jazz Dance” and an inventive, straight-feel take on Steve Wonder’s “Higher Ground,” with Ellis Hall on vocals.

Related

CD Review: "Mocean Worker"

Encouraged by Marcus Miller, with whom he has recorded and performed (most recently on “I Can’t Breathe” from Miller’s Afrodeezia), DJ Mocean Worker puts his considerable bass skills front and center for the first time on his latest house/electro-swing effort.

CD Review: Fourplay "Silver"

Fourplay (Nathan East, Bob James, Harvey Mason, and Chuck Loeb) celebrates its 25th anniversary with an inspired outing that includes former guitar members Larry Carlton and Lee Ritenour as guests.