CD Review: Kendrick Lamar "To Pimp a Butterfly"

While much of the attention around Lamar’s new album falls on the all-star production team led by Dr. Dre, Pharrell Williams, and Flying Lotus, we bass lovers know that the real heart of this record is the tripped-out, psychedelic playing of Thundercat.
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While much of the attention around Lamar’s new album falls on the all-star production team led by Dr. Dre, Pharrell Williams, and Flying Lotus, we bass lovers know that the real heart of this record is the tripped-out, psychedelic playing of Thundercat. His slippery, envelope-filter-dripping lines on the George Clinton collabo “Wesley’s Theory” sets the tone, which only intensifies with his funky playing on “These Walls” and “Hood Politics.” Thanks to its central focus on bass, this highly anticipated album certainly lives up to its hype.

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