CD Review: Of Montreal "Aureate Gloom"

Of Montreal’s newest album is a funk-meets-psychedelic indie-rock bender that kicks off with a superfly groove by Bob Parins on the album’s opener, “Bassem Sabry.”
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Of Montreal’s newest album is a funk-meets-psychedelic indie-rock bender that kicks off with a superfly groove by Bob Parins on the album’s opener, “Bassem Sabry.” While zealous vocals are the only thing that remains stylistically consistent on this album, the bass muscles its way through the record’s mixed genres: Whether he’s punk-style speed-picking on “Empyrean Abattoir” or calmly rolling his way through “Estocadas,” Parins’ work on Aureate Gloom makes it a fun listen.

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