CD Review: The Wood Brothers "Paradise"

On their sixth album, the Wood Brothers move well beyond their folk–country roots and break into Americana/indie-rock territory.
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On their sixth album, the Wood Brothers move well beyond their folk–country roots and break into Americana/indie-rock territory. Between grooving hard on “American Heartache” and “Raindrop” and showing his skills on the harmonica on “Singin’ to Strangers,” Chris Wood is a focal point; his vibrant lines and earthy upright tones fuel one of the best road-trip albums of the year.

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