CD Review: "Things You Can't See"

Harmonics, hard-rocking riffs, bowed double bass, distortion pedals, spacey electric-upright runs—and that’s only the first two songs of Owl’s new EP.
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Harmonics, hard-rocking riffs, bowed double bass, distortion pedals, spacey electric-upright runs—and that’s only the first two songs of Owl’s new EP. Low-end renaissance man Chris Wyse shows off the big bag of techniques and songwriting skills that have made him a top-call player for A-list rockers. But even with all his chops, his trio’s latest record is its most evolved and widely accessible yet.

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