Conrad Korsch

Conrad Korsch Live Love Leave [Scrumptious Music] Longtime Rod Stewart doubler and top Gotham thumper Conrad Korsch makes his solo debut with a stylish singer-songwriter set. The tales of love and loss are crafted around Korsch’s visceral vocals, archtop guitar, upright, fretless, and a string quartet. Among the touchstones are the angular, arpeggiodriven “True Love,” the French Horn-filtered “Weeping Willow,” “Firefly” (featuring Roseanne Cash), and the Jay Leonhart-nodding “Love Story of a Blade of Grass and a Pine Tree.”
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Conrad Korsch

Live Love Leave [Scrumptious Music]

Longtime Rod Stewart doubler and top Gotham thumper Conrad Korsch makes his solo debut with a stylish singer-songwriter set. The tales of love and loss are crafted around Korsch’s visceral vocals, archtop guitar, upright, fretless, and a string quartet. Among the touchstones are the angular, arpeggiodriven “True Love,” the French Horn-filtered “Weeping Willow,” “Firefly” (featuring Roseanne Cash), and the Jay Leonhart-nodding “Love Story of a Blade of Grass and a Pine Tree.”

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