Francis Mbappe, Peace is Freedom [FM Groove]

“In our music, the bass is in front, even louder than the voice,” Cameroon-born bassist Francis Mbappe asserted in the September issue’s Woodshed lesson on the bass in Cameroonian music.
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“In our music, the bass is in front, even louder than the voice,” Cameroon-born bassist Francis Mbappe asserted in the September issue’s Woodshed lesson on the bass in Cameroonian music. Mbappe’s bass and vocals are equally deserving of praise on his latest solo effort, but from the sweet double-stops and impeccable phrasing of the albums opener to the percussive, unstoppable groove of its closer, it’s definitely bass that commands the lions share of this listener’s attention. And on Peace Is Freedom, Mbappe’s bass is pure bliss.

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