Iron & Wine, Kiss Each Other Clean [Warner Bros.]

On his fourth studio album, Iron & Wine main man Samuel Beam leans hard on his touring rhythm section—and especially on bassist Matt Lux—making a record that reaches far beyond the mellow singer-songwriter vibe he’s championed in years past.
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On his fourth studio album, Iron & Wine main man Samuel Beam leans hard on his touring rhythm section—and especially on bassist Matt Lux—making a record that reaches far beyond the mellow singer-songwriter vibe he’s championed in years past. With plunky, Hofner-esque tone and expertly executed mid-register melodic runs, Lux plays equal parts Paul McCartney and Rick Danko to Bream’s brainy ’70s-style pop-rock vocals. Lux is luminous on the bass-led “Monkeys Uptown” and shines bright laying it down on “Big Burned Hand.” Pick it up, pop it in, and luxuriate in harmonic bliss.

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