Larry Knechtel 1940–2009

LARRY KNECHTEL, A CHARTER MEMBER OF LOS ANGELES’S famed “Wrecking Crew” team of studio players, passed away in Yakima, Washington on August 20th, 2009. His extraordinary talents on a variety of instruments were surpassed only by his humility and love for his family. A Grammy winner for his piano playing and arranging on Simon & Garfunkel’s “Bridge Over Troubled Water,” Larry also played bass guitar on a phenomenal range of records, including The Byrds’ “Mr. Tambourine Man”, Simon & Garfunkel’s “Mrs. Robinson,” and The Doors’ selftitled debut album, which included the breakthrough hit “Light My Fire”. His melodic lines, fat tone, and unique phrasing made him one of a select few who defined the art of recording the Fender Bass in the ’60s. Larry was a soulful, earthy, and brilliant musician, and was all those things and more as a person. He is survived by his wife Vicki, and children Lonnie and Shelli. Rest In Peace, brother.
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LARRY KNECHTEL, A CHARTER MEMBER OF LOS ANGELES’S famed “Wrecking Crew” team of studio players, passed away in Yakima, Washington on August 20th, 2009. His extraordinary talents on a variety of instruments were surpassed only by his humility and love for his family. A Grammy winner for his piano playing and arranging on Simon & Garfunkel’s “Bridge Over Troubled Water,” Larry also played bass guitar on a phenomenal range of records, including The Byrds’ “Mr. Tambourine Man”, Simon & Garfunkel’s “Mrs. Robinson,” and The Doors’ selftitled debut album, which included the breakthrough hit “Light My Fire”. His melodic lines, fat tone, and unique phrasing made him one of a select few who defined the art of recording the Fender Bass in the ’60s. Larry was a soulful, earthy, and brilliant musician, and was all those things and more as a person. He is survived by his wife Vicki, and children Lonnie and Shelli. Rest In Peace, brother.

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