Larry Knechtel 1940–2009

LARRY KNECHTEL, A CHARTER MEMBER OF LOS ANGELES’S famed “Wrecking Crew” team of studio players, passed away in Yakima, Washington on August 20th, 2009. His extraordinary talents on a variety of instruments were surpassed only by his humility and love for his family. A Grammy winner for his piano playing and arranging on Simon & Garfunkel’s “Bridge Over Troubled Water,” Larry also played bass guitar on a phenomenal range of records, including The Byrds’ “Mr. Tambourine Man”, Simon & Garfunkel’s “Mrs. Robinson,” and The Doors’ selftitled debut album, which included the breakthrough hit “Light My Fire”. His melodic lines, fat tone, and unique phrasing made him one of a select few who defined the art of recording the Fender Bass in the ’60s. Larry was a soulful, earthy, and brilliant musician, and was all those things and more as a person. He is survived by his wife Vicki, and children Lonnie and Shelli. Rest In Peace, brother.
Author:
Updated:
Original:

LARRY KNECHTEL, A CHARTER MEMBER OF LOS ANGELES’S famed “Wrecking Crew” team of studio players, passed away in Yakima, Washington on August 20th, 2009. His extraordinary talents on a variety of instruments were surpassed only by his humility and love for his family. A Grammy winner for his piano playing and arranging on Simon & Garfunkel’s “Bridge Over Troubled Water,” Larry also played bass guitar on a phenomenal range of records, including The Byrds’ “Mr. Tambourine Man”, Simon & Garfunkel’s “Mrs. Robinson,” and The Doors’ selftitled debut album, which included the breakthrough hit “Light My Fire”. His melodic lines, fat tone, and unique phrasing made him one of a select few who defined the art of recording the Fender Bass in the ’60s. Larry was a soulful, earthy, and brilliant musician, and was all those things and more as a person. He is survived by his wife Vicki, and children Lonnie and Shelli. Rest In Peace, brother.

Related

Retro-Rama : 1940 Kay C-1

 This bass belonged to Music City legend Floyd “Lightnin’” Chance (1926–2005), and currently resides in the Musicians Hall of Fame in Nashville. Chance was one of the top acoustic bass players in the Nashville from the early ’50s until his retirement in 1988, and he played on records with everyone from the Everly Brothers to Marty Robbins to Hank Williams, Sr., including Hank’s final recording session in 1952 that included the classic “Your Cheatin’ Heart.”

Dickie Peterson 1946–2009

DICKIE PETERSON, FOUNDING member of the hard rock band Blue Cheer, died October 12th in Erkelenz, Germany. The 63-year-old singer and bassist had been battling liver cancer. Coming out of San Francisco in the late ’60s, Blue Cheer took the flower-power psychedelia of bands like Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead and gave it a harder edge, crafting a sound that would later be echoed in punk rock and heavy metal. As bassist and singer, Peterson poured his heart and soul into the band, a blues-rooted power trio in the vein of Cream and Mountain. The band’s 1968 debut Vincebus Eruptum contained its biggest hit, a remake of the Eddie Cochran song “Summertime Blues.” Blue Cheer dissolved in 1972, but Peterson revived the rock troupe in 1984, and later recorded two solo albums. Until being overtaken by the Who in 1976, Blue Cheer was listed as the “Loudest Band in the World” by the Guinness Book of World Records. In a video interview at serenedominic. com, Peterson described how the

Charlie Haden: Grand Ole Opry Redux

ON MARCH 5, LEGENDARY JAZZ bassist Charlie Haden had a long awaited homecoming at Nashville’s legendary Grand Ole Opry, some 60 years after his family band last performed on the Ryman stage. As a child growing up in Missouri, many famous Nashville musicians would stop by and visit the Haden home while on tour, including Chet Atkins, Grady Martin, and Hank Garland, who advised Charlie to “head west and study jazz”. By his late teens, Haden was quickly becoming one of the preeminent bassists in jazz, establishing himself with free jazz pioneer Ornette Coleman and going on to collaborate with a innumerable pillars of the art form. He’s also made his own compositional statements with groups like the Liberation Music Orchestra and Quartet West.

Bassplayer Live : 2009 Overview

FOR THE SECOND CONSECUTIVE YEAR, SUNSET Boulevard in Los Angeles served as the stylish backdrop for BASS PLAYER LIVE!, on October 24 and 25. With the event scheduled seven days earlier than last year’s Halloween-weekend tilt, and with one of the most comprehensive lineups yet assembled, there was nary a hint of a sophomore jinx. In fact, BPL 2009 tallied its highest-ever number of exhibitors and attendees. The proceedings actually began on the evening of the 23rd at Musicians Institute in Hollywood, with a screening of Rambling Boy, the new documentary on the life of jazz legend Charlie Haden. Haden—who joined Tower Of Power groove god Francis “Rocco” Prestia as recipients of BP’s 2009 Lifetime Achievement Award—spoke afterward, along with filmmaker Reto Caduff.

Review: Larry Graham

RAISE UP [Razor & Tie] Larry Graham’s first album in 13 years is an instant reminder that unless you’ve seen him live over the past decade you haven’t been experiencing the full force of funk, as established by a cornerstone founder of the idiom.

Retro-Rama : 1973 Hagstrom Swede

HAGSTROM WAS FOUNDED IN ALVDALEN, SWEDEN IN THE 1920S by 19-year-old Albin Hagstrom. The company initially specialized in making accordions, and business grew steadily through the ’30s and ’40s, despite the economic turmoil of World War II. In addition to building musical instruments, the company also operated a large chain of music stores throughout Scandinavia. By the late 1950s, Hagstrom jumped into the burgeoning guitar market in a big way and successfully marketed their instruments world wide through various distributors, including Selmer in the U.S.