Lorenzo Feliciati, Frequent Flyer [Rare Noise]

On his second studio effort, Roman bassist Lorenzo Feliciati once again shows his mastery of sound-mural creation via loops, effects, and such like-minded exploratory musicians as drummer Pat Mastelotto, keyboardist Roy Powell, and horn guests Bob Mintzer and Cuong Vu.
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On his second studio effort, Roman bassist Lorenzo Feliciati once again shows his mastery of sound-mural creation via loops, effects, and such like-minded exploratory musicians as drummer Pat Mastelotto, keyboardist Roy Powell, and horn guests Bob Mintzer and Cuong Vu. Among the soaring sonic scenes are Mintzer’s “outside” tenor cutting through the post-nuke haze of “The Fastswing Park Rules,” Feliciati’s funky upright and DJ Skizo’s turntables casting “The White Shadow,” and Feliciati’s fingerbusting 16ths greasing “Groove First” and the Indian-spiced “Thela Hun Ginjeet,” on fretted and fretless respectively.

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