Mew: No More Stories Are Told Today The World Is Grey I’m Sorry I’m Tired They washed Away Let’s Wash Away [Columbia]

This morphean music might slow you down, but only a fool would sleep through Mew. The Danish rock band hit a bump when founding bassist Johan Wolhert bowed out in 2006, but it’s done well here to call up Damon Tutunjian and Bastian Juel for support. A luscious, lofty lullaby of dreamy ditties, this disc displays the best elements of good shoegaze: compelling songcraft and perfect pacing. Aside from the spastically funky “Introducing Palace Place,” there’s little in-your-face bass. It totally works. If you missed the band’s latest North America tour, take the time to bone up on this batch of well-made music. Next time, you’ll want to stay up and sing along.
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This morphean music might slow you down, but only a fool would sleep through Mew. The Danish rock band hit a bump when founding bassist Johan Wolhert bowed out in 2006, but it’s done well here to call up Damon Tutunjian and Bastian Juel for support. A luscious, lofty lullaby of dreamy ditties, this disc displays the best elements of good shoegaze: compelling songcraft and perfect pacing. Aside from the spastically funky “Introducing Palace Place,” there’s little in-your-face bass. It totally works. If you missed the band’s latest North America tour, take the time to bone up on this batch of well-made music. Next time, you’ll want to stay up and sing along.

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