Motion City Soundtrack, My Dinosaur Life [Columbia] - BassPlayer.com

Motion City Soundtrack, My Dinosaur Life [Columbia]

Power pop is alive and thriving on Motion City Soundtrack’s fourth fulllength, which stocks more hooks than a tackle shop and is played with bowlingsized balls. Producer Mark Hoppus no doubt left his mega-platinum mark in spots, but Motion City Soundtrack stands here on the strength of its own songcraft and musicality. Matthew Taylor pours a solid foundation for the band’s wall of sound, popping out at points to prove himself a badass bassist with tasty tone and for-real feel.
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Power pop is alive and thriving on Motion City Soundtrack’s fourth fulllength, which stocks more hooks than a tackle shop and is played with bowlingsized balls. Producer Mark Hoppus no doubt left his mega-platinum mark in spots, but Motion City Soundtrack stands here on the strength of its own songcraft and musicality. Matthew Taylor pours a solid foundation for the band’s wall of sound, popping out at points to prove himself a badass bassist with tasty tone and for-real feel.

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