New York State of Mind - BassPlayer.com

New York State of Mind

ONE OF THE THINGS THAT MAKES NEW YORK SO INCREDIBLE is its sheer density of interesting, creative people. It’s as evident in the music as it is among the people making the tools for those musicians. I recently headed east to visit a bunch of the top bass and amp builders in the biz. One thing I learned: when it comes to bass building, tiny little Woodstock gives the Big Apple a run for its money! The shot at left was from heck of a memorable dinner with some of the brightest bulbs in bass. There’s many more cool pix from my week-long sojourn to check out. Just got to our blog www.bassplayer.com.
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ONE OF THE THINGS THAT MAKES NEW YORK SO INCREDIBLE is its sheer density of interesting, creative people. It’s as evident in the music as it is among the people making the tools for those musicians. I recently headed east to visit a bunch of the top bass and amp builders in the biz. One thing I learned: when it comes to bass building, tiny little Woodstock gives the Big Apple a run for its money! The shot at left was from heck of a memorable dinner with some of the brightest bulbs in bass. There’s many more cool pix from my week-long sojourn to check out. Just got to our blog www.bassplayer.com

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Sharlee D’angelo of Arch Enemy

I think it’s great actually that people are getting interested in musicianship as such again – especially the guitar players, you’d be amazed by how fast they are, and their technique and everything. And some of them, you give them a few more years and I think someone will probably come up with stuff even better. So I think it’s a good thing. People start out playing a lot of technical stuff and then after a while they’ll probably slow down a little bit and just use whatever musical abilities they have to go to the next level.

Byron Stroud of Fear Factory

I find a lot bass players – especially [bassists who] played with Devin before me – they're like guitar players that play bass, or just come along and start playing bass. I think I brought a different thought process to it. I came in as a bass player, and musically that's about it. But I bring in a lot of [the] business side of things too. A lot of bands, especially with Strapping, didn't have any kind of business direction, and I came on board and definitely helped with that.

Chris Beattie of Hatebreed

I don’t want to be overly aggressive, but I like to have a clean tone so you can hear every note, like defined individually, but I like to dirty it up so it’s in the mix where it’s almost like a guitar but it has a lot of bottom to it. I like balls, and the definition. Those are my key things.

Ryan Martinie of Mudvayne

 It's the relationship. It's not about how good or how fast or how many inversions I can play. It's the relationship that my parts bear to the other things that are happening within the song and whether it's musical or not, whether it serves a purpose or not.

William Murderface Of Dethklok

You can’t put into words what I do. It’s like asking Robert DeNiro how to act, or why George Burns was a comedy genius. I mean, we’ve just got the goods. There’s no secret formula. And I’m sure all the sad struggling bassists out there will read this hoping for the secret to being an amazing bass player like me, and there isn’t one and then they’ll kill themselves.