Nicki Parrott: Fly Me to the Moon - BassPlayer.com

Nicki Parrott: Fly Me to the Moon

Coming off a nine-year stint with the late Les Paul, Australian-born Nicki Parrott issues her second solo effort in as many years, using standards to showcase her considerable skills as a bass-playing chanteuse. As compelling as her relaxed, come-hither vocal style is her choice of such offbeat gems as “Charade,” “Waltzing Matilda,” and “Two for the Road.” Down under, her upright is big on tone, swing, and support, with step-outs on the title track, “Evil Gal Blues,” “Them There Eyes,” and a scat-nbass solo on “Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen.”
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Coming off a nine-year stint with the late Les Paul, Australian-born Nicki Parrott issues her second solo effort in as many years, using standards to showcase her considerable skills as a bass-playing chanteuse. As compelling as her relaxed, come-hither vocal style is her choice of such offbeat gems as “Charade,” “Waltzing Matilda,” and “Two for the Road.” Down under, her upright is big on tone, swing, and support, with step-outs on the title track, “Evil Gal Blues,” “Them There Eyes,” and a scat-nbass solo on “Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen.”

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