Outside Lands

ARMED WITH A PHOTO PASS AND INDUSTRIAL-STRENGTH EARPLUGS, I charged in front of the crowds to capture these shots at San Francisco’s second annual Outside Lands festival. Find more at bassplayer.com, and check in next month for interviews with Ben Kenney of Incubus and Senon Williams of Dengue Fever.
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ARMED WITH A PHOTO PASS AND INDUSTRIAL-STRENGTH EARPLUGS, I charged in front of the crowds to capture these shots at San Francisco’s second annual Outside Lands festival. Find more at bassplayer.com, and check in next month for interviews with Ben Kenney of Incubus and

Senon Williams of Dengue Fever.

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Inside Outside Lands

ONCE REGARDED AS A SANDY WASTELAND AND A WORTHLESS STRETCH OF REAL ESTATE, San Francisco’s Outside Lands—much of it now preserved in the city’s Golden Gate Park—proved itself to be musically fertile ground in the 1960s, when its grassy patches absorbed the vibrations of Phil Lesh and the Grateful Dead, Jack Casady and Jefferson Airplane, Peter Albin and Big Brother & the Holding Company, and David Freiberg and Quicksilver Messenger Service.

Eric Avery: Sound Tsunami: Ocean Size Subhooks Return To JANE’S ADDICTION

STALKING THE STAGE LIKE A caged cat, pounding his low-slung PBass with a sneer solidly etched on his face, Eric Avery seems like a man with a lot on his mind. Between 1985 and 1991, the Jane’s Addiction bassist crafted some of the catchiest subhooks in modern rock. Since rejoining the seminal alternative rock band earlier this year, he’s been on a quest to make it all sound better. On a recent stop outside San Francisco, Avery sat for a spell with BP to talk about the perils of low end, the importance of punch, and his practiced methods for attaining balance.

Incubus Ben Kenney Talking Tone

PART ROCK STAR, PART HIP-HOP aficionado, and all musician, tone hound Ben Kenney knows a thing or two about sounding good. It’s something Kenney’s able to do whether he’s rocking arenas with Incubus or playing multi-instrumentalist madman in his home studio.

The Cribs' Gary Jarman On Melodic Punk Rock

LAST YEAR WAS A BUSY ONE FOR Cribs frontman Gary Jarman; his melodic post-punk brood with brothers Ryan and Ross released its fourth album (featuring “newbie” bandmate Johnny Marr on guitar), he married his girlfriend Joanna Bolme (bassist for Quasi and Stephen Malkmus & the Jicks), and he went under the knife for a surgery on his vocal chords. Yet judging from his band’s demanding tour schedule, the Yorkshire native (and Portland resident) shows no signs of slowing. On a recent stop in San Francisco, Gary took a few minutes to talk punk rock, warming up, and the joy of a well-crafted countermelody.

CCR's Stu Cook

Imagine the San Francisco Bay Area circa 1967, and any number of landmark moments in rock & roll history come to mind—the Grateful Dead on the steps at 710 Ashbury St., Jefferson Airplane expanding minds at the Fillmore, Janis Joplin belting it out at the Human Be-In.

Dickie Peterson 1946–2009

DICKIE PETERSON, FOUNDING member of the hard rock band Blue Cheer, died October 12th in Erkelenz, Germany. The 63-year-old singer and bassist had been battling liver cancer. Coming out of San Francisco in the late ’60s, Blue Cheer took the flower-power psychedelia of bands like Jefferson Airplane and the Grateful Dead and gave it a harder edge, crafting a sound that would later be echoed in punk rock and heavy metal. As bassist and singer, Peterson poured his heart and soul into the band, a blues-rooted power trio in the vein of Cream and Mountain. The band’s 1968 debut Vincebus Eruptum contained its biggest hit, a remake of the Eddie Cochran song “Summertime Blues.” Blue Cheer dissolved in 1972, but Peterson revived the rock troupe in 1984, and later recorded two solo albums. Until being overtaken by the Who in 1976, Blue Cheer was listed as the “Loudest Band in the World” by the Guinness Book of World Records. In a video interview at serenedominic. com, Peterson described how the