Review: Ballake Sissoko "At Peace" - BassPlayer.com

Review: Ballake Sissoko "At Peace"

There’s a lushness of range to the Malian many-stringed kora that makes you forget you’re listening to one instrument, and Sissoko is a deft hand at bringing out all its nuances—especially the low end, which resonates with a surprising depth on contemplative ballads like “Boubalaka” and the cascading “Asa Branca” (featuring the plucked cello of Vincent Segal).
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There’s a lushness of range to the Malian many-stringed kora that makes you forget you’re listening to one instrument, and Sissoko is a deft hand at bringing out all its nuances—especially the low end, which resonates with a surprising depth on contemplative ballads like “Boubalaka” and the cascading “Asa Branca” (featuring the plucked cello of Vincent Segal). This is music that might be older than the blues, but in its own quiet way, it dips and sways with just as much sensuality.

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