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Review: Charles Flores "Impressions of Gravity" - BassPlayer.com

Review: Charles Flores "Impressions of Gravity"

Sadly, Charles Flores’ sophomore solo CD—a sturdy set of Latin jazz originals—is a posthumously-released one.
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Sadly, Charles Flores’ sophomore solo CD—a sturdy set of Latin jazz originals—is a posthumously-released one. The Cuban-born Flores, a member of the Michel Camilo Trio since 2002, succumbed to cancer last August. Joined here by Camilo drummer Cliff Almond, pianist Elio Villafranca and guest guitarist Wayne Krantz, Flores favors his 6-string, most effectively handling the melody on the swaying “Miriam,” and issuing a dense 6/8 groove and eventful solo on “Influence.” Ultimately, it’s his lone upright statement, the haunting “Gentile Words,” that will stay with you.

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