Review: David Bowie "The Next Day"

Like the CD cover, Gail Ann Dorsey’s sumptuous lines on seven of this album’s 14 songs contain sly references to Bowie classics, but they’re also a showcase for the chemistry she and the Thin White Duke have honed over the last 18 years.
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[Columbia]
Like the CD cover, Gail Ann Dorsey’s sumptuous lines on seven of this album’s 14 songs contain sly references to Bowie classics, but they’re also a showcase for the chemistry she and the Thin White Duke have honed over the last 18 years. The rest of the tracks are expertly supported by veteran Bowie producer Tony Visconti and the inimitable Tony Levin, who contributes a gorgeous part to “Where Are We Now” and more than a few drops of funky Chapman Stick magic to “Boss of Me.”

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