Review: Flea

If you expect a Flea solo album to be packed with whirlwind slapping and Peppers-esque, high-energy licks, get ready for a surprise.
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Helen Burns [Warner Bros.]

If you expect a Flea solo album to be packed with whirlwind slapping and Peppers-esque, high-energy licks, get ready for a surprise. Helen Burns, a brief peek at Flea’s quiet side, reveals shades of introspection and melancholy. The bass is still prominent— songs like “Pedestal of Infamy” and “333” have plenty of luscious low end—but not in the capacity we’re used to from the wild one.

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