Review: Flying Lotus

FlyLo’s latest set may be slightly leaner than his 2010 breakthrough, Cosmogramma, but it’s still a lush and skittering jazztinged dreamscape with a bevy of ace contributors.
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Until the Quiet Comes [Brainfeeder]

FlyLo’s latest set may be slightly leaner than his 2010 breakthrough, Cosmogramma , but it’s still a lush and skittering jazztinged dreamscape with a bevy of ace contributors. Chief among them, of course, is Thundercat, who returns to add lead vocals to “DMT Song” and his distinctive touch to nine of the album’s 18 tracks. (Dig that flatwound-strung Ibanez Artcore!)

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