Review: John Leibman

Twenty years after it first hit shelves, Funk Bass is still one of the best ways to learn how to put the fire under a funk band.
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FUNK BASS
[Hal Leonard]

Twenty years after it first hit shelves, Funk Bass is still one of the best ways to learn how to put the fire under a funk band. In this second edition, the pictures of author Jon Leibman remain the same, but the added chord symbols, vastly improved CD, and expanded gear and discography appendices bring this must-have into the 21st century. Leibman’s emphasis on grooving is more important than ever, and going through the exercises—written in both notation and tablature—will do wonders for your reading, your ear, and your practice habits.

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