Review: Judas Priest "Epitaph"

Don’t let the title fool you—this live concert DVD proves that Judas Priest is not only still alive but is also still kicking ass.
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Don’t let the title fool you—this live concert DVD proves that Judas Priest is not only still alive but is also still kicking ass. Representing 14 releases from 1974 to 2008, this 23-song retrospective proves the band is as relevant as its legacy is rich. Founding bassist Ian Hill knows his role in the band: thicken the guitar riff s to make them heavier, and hold down the ground artillery while the guitar solos go airborne. Newcomer Richie Faulkner, replacing retired guitarist K.K. Downing, adds youthful fire that encourages veteran co-guitarist Glenn Tipton to step up his game. Scott Travis expertly blends old- and new-school metal drumming to accompany the repertoire’s stylistic evolution, and frontman Rob Halford defies metal vocalist statistics by improving with age. Epitaph stands as an awesome monument to classic British heavy metal.

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