Review: Lunasa "Lunasa with the RTE Concert Orchestra"

When traditional music embarks on the seemingly inevitable orchestral collaboration, direction is everything; the defining nuances and characteristics risk being subverted and washed out by a wave of symphonic grandeur.
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When traditional music embarks on the seemingly inevitable orchestral collaboration, direction is everything; the defining nuances and characteristics risk being subverted and washed out by a wave of symphonic grandeur. Not so with this beautifully arranged live offering from Irish acoustic group Lunasa. It’s as if the orchestra were led by the band on a stroll through the Emerald Isle countryside, rather than the band becoming a Celtic ornament in the concert hall. Trevor Hutchinson’s bowed and plucked double bass not only expands the range and depth of the ensemble’s sound, but it also serves as a sonic and symbolic pivot point between the two genres. A flawless and moving performance.

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