Rick Rosas, Bass Player for Neil Young, Has Died

With a touching statement by Pegi Young.
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Rick Rosas passed away on Thursday, November 6th at 65. The bass player appeared on six Neil Young albums, between the years 1988 and 2009, and regularly toured with Young, also playing with his wife's band, Pegi Young & the Survivors.

He also played with Jerry Lee Lewis and Etta James over the years, as well as Young associated acts Buffalo Springfield and Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young. Earlier this year Rosas filled in for Crazy Horse bassist Billy Talbot on the Neil Young and Crazy Horse European tour, after Talbot suffered a stroke.

The cause of Rosas death was not yet announced.

Statement by Pegi Young:

On Thursday, November 6th, I lost one of the dearest friends I had. An original Survivor, RTBP gave me love and encouragement and support as I progressed from a shy and timid singer and songwriter on our first record right through to the making of our last record, Lonely In A Crowed Room, which he loved and was very proud of.

He was a brother to me as I was a sister to him. Knowing he was always there on stage at my right shoulder gave me great comfort and support. He was always there for me through thick and thin and never let me down.

His loss is a terrible shock to our band of Survivors, along with his many other dear friends and loved ones. So respected in the music community, he was truly an amazing bass player. I was incredibly lucky and honored to have him in my band and to count him among my friends.

As with our dear friend, Ben Keith, Rick too passed on the occasion of the full moon.

His loss is profound and we will always miss him. Our hearts go out to his long time partner, Elizabeth, and the rest of his family they suffer through this unexpected and unthinkable loss.

Sending you love and light as you travel to the other side Rick.

Love always.

Pegi

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