Standing In The Shadows of Hitsville

On August 11th, more than 100 members of the Facebook group Detroit Bass Players converged on the Motown Historical Museum for their second annual group photo.
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Standing In The Shadows Of Hitsville

On August 11th, more than 100 members of the Facebook group Detroit Bass Players converged on the Motown Historical Museum for their second annual group photo. Founded by area bassist Craig Skoney, the collective includes such players as Kern Brantley, Ralphe Armstrong, and Al “The Burner” Turner. facebook.com/groups/DetroitBassPlayers

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