Tedeschi Trucks Band, Revelator [Sony Masterworks] - BassPlayer.com

Tedeschi Trucks Band, Revelator [Sony Masterworks]

Leaning on their best rhythm section to date—Oteil Burbridge and Austin drummer J.J. Johnson—and a horn-infused 11-piece ensemble, Allman Brothers guitar great Derek Trucks and his wife, vocalist supreme Susan Tedeschi have crafted a Grammy-worthy collection of earthy, heartfelt, hook-laden tunes.
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Leaning on their best rhythm section to date—Oteil Burbridge and Austin drummer J.J. Johnson—and a horn-infused 11-piece ensemble, Allman Brothers guitar great Derek Trucks and his wife, vocalist supreme Susan Tedeschi have crafted a Grammy-worthy collection of earthy, heartfelt, hook-laden tunes. Oteil, with flatwound-strung P-Bass in hand, adheres to the ’60s-proven formula that great songs beget great bass lines. Dig his “Son of a Preacher Man”-like lilt on “Bound for Glory,” upbeat-pushing boogaloo pulse on “Come See about Me,” vocal-answering riff on the Delta-driven “Learn How to Love,” and especially his Meters-fed broken 16ths on “Love Has Something Else to Say.” Throw in his Allman-signature sweet-spot upper-register fills throughout and we’re talking plenty of root revelation to go around.

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