Yellowjackets: New Morning: The Paris Concert (DVD) [Heads Up, 2009]

The Jackets’ time-tested progressive jazz gets a thorough workout in this March 2008 show at the renowned Paris venue New Morning, and the resulting document captures the intimate feeling of a small club show, but with the benefit of top-notch audio and video production quality. It’s cliché to say, “It feels like you’re really there,” but in this case it’s thankfully apropos. The special treats for Jimmy Haslip fans include syncopated rhythms on “Capetown” and “Cross Current” executed with such confidence and skill that they land with the impact of miniature kick drums, his fiendish swing walking on “Bop Boy,” his deeply soulful solo in “Even Song,” and a bonus feature consisting of a seven-minute interview/history lesson about the band with Haslip himself. For anyone who’s heard about Jimmy Haslip’s playing with the Yellowjackets a million times and never actually seen it live, it’s really worth checking out what makes him—and them— so special.
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The Jackets’ time-tested progressive jazz gets a thorough workout in this March 2008 show at the renowned Paris venue New Morning, and the resulting document captures the intimate feeling of a small club show, but with the benefit of top-notch audio and video production quality. It’s cliché to say, “It feels like you’re really there,” but in this case it’s thankfully apropos. The special treats for Jimmy Haslip fans include syncopated rhythms on “Capetown” and “Cross Current” executed with such confidence and skill that they land with the impact of miniature kick drums, his fiendish swing walking on “Bop Boy,” his deeply soulful solo in “Even Song,” and a bonus feature consisting of a seven-minute interview/history lesson about the band with Haslip himself. For anyone who’s heard about Jimmy Haslip’s playing with the Yellowjackets a million times and never actually seen it live, it’s really worth checking out what makes him—and them— so special.

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