Jim Marshall, 1936-2010

In the world of music magazine publishing, Jim Marshall was probably just as important as the musicians he photographed. In an industry where image so frequently becomes perception, Marshall's keen eye and craftsmanship produced thousands of photographs which may have
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In the world of music magazine publishing, Jim Marshall was probably just as important as the musicians he photographed. In an industry where image so frequently becomes perception, Marshall's keen eye and craftsmanship produced thousands of photographs which may have

In the world of music magazine publishing, Jim Marshall was probably just as important as the musicians he photographed. In an industry where image so frequently becomes perception, Marshall's keen eye and craftsmanship produced thousands of photographs which may have done more to shape many artists’ images than the artists themselves. ?

In the 26 years I knew and worked with Jim, I never met a photographer more dedicated to the purity of his craft or more solid in the belief that the photos he was creating were an integral part of the fabric of the music scene as a whole.??

When I began my career as a magazine designer, Jim Marshall was a larger-than-life figure, and even as we grew to become friends and collaborators, I was always a bit intimidated by his intense demand that the standards he set for his own quality and attention to detail be matched by everyone. To me he will always be that gold standard for music photography.??

The industry will be poorer without him and he will be greatly missed.

— Paul Haggard, Bass Player Art Director

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