Boss: TU-1000 Stage Tuner

Ah, the humble tuner—there are few accessories as unexciting, but the underappreciated tuner is nonetheless a must-have for any serious player’s gig bag. For what seems like ages, the ubiquitous Boss TU-2 tuner has been one of the most popular stompboxes on the market, due in large part to its rugged construction and tuning accuracy. For those seeking a more robust intonation station, there’s Boss’s new TU-1000 Stage Tuner.
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Ah, the humble tuner—there are few accessories as unexciting, but the underappreciated tuner is nonetheless a must-have for any serious player’s gig bag. For what seems like ages, the ubiquitous Boss TU-2 tuner has been one of the most popular stompboxes on the market, due in large part to its rugged construction and tuning accuracy. For those seeking a more robust intonation station, there’s Boss’s new TU-1000 Stage Tuner.

With its bright LED panel, multiple display options, and ability to power up to six other stompboxes, the TU-1000 is no joke. The tuner’s large, bright screen made low-light operation a cinch, and I dug being able to switch the display style from CENT, where LEDs sweep like a needle in need of centering, to STREAM, where a flashing cascade of lights indicates the degree of de-tuned-ness. The bright arrows on either side of the note display made it extra clear how I needed to tweak my tuning pegs, with both arrows lighting simultaneously when I arrived at correct pitch.

Weighing 4 pounds and measuring 16 inches across, the TU-1000 is a bit of a beast to heave around, but I found its ability to double as a power source for my other stompboxes—not to mention its huge, well-lighted read-out—made it worth the schlep. Turns out the new kid in tune town is pretty cool after all.

BOSS TU-1000

Street $259
Pros Bright LED read-out; power for up to six stompboxes
Cons A bit bulky

Contact www.bossus.com (323) 890-3743
Made in Japan
Warranty One year limited

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