Trey Gunn & Marco Minnemann, Modulator [7d Media and treygunn.com]

The back cover of this disc reads as follows: “This recording was composed and produced on top of a single, 51-minute live drum solo by Marco Minnemann.”
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The back cover of this disc reads as follows: “This recording was composed and produced on top of a single, 51-minute live drum solo by Marco Minnemann.” Minnemann, one of a spare few drummers who could make such a thing musically interesting, tracked it with the intention of giving it to several brave artists and letting them do whatever they wanted on top of it; avant-garde bassist and Warr “touch guitar” player Trey Gunn (King Crimson, UKZ) was one of those foolhardy enough to take up the challenge. It took him two years, but Gunn’s quirky, ethereal compositional strengths—and his background as both a film/TV scorer and progressive-minded instrumentalist—somehow transform this “drum solo” into a single continuous composition of experimental music, with a healthy emphasis on unusual bass-and-drum grooves. The worthwhile result is challenging, compelling, frightening, and ultimately, a strange kind of beautiful.

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